Tag Archives: smoke

Smoke Haze Due To Controlled Burn

Last night (May 8) it was a cloud on the western horizon – today it’s a smelly haze hanging over the town.
What’s Burning?
It is an “Ecosystem restoration burn planned for Gibbs Creek” according to the BC Wildfire Service.

According to the site page:
The key goals of this burn include:

  • rejuvenating the shrub, herb and grass layer, which will enhance habitat for mule deer, white-tailed deer and elk;
  • improving overall biodiversity in the area and promoting more climate-resilient tree stands; and
  • reducing accumulations of dead and combustible material, which will decrease the risk of future catastrophic wildfires in the area.

We can all hope that it goes well and the smoke quickly dissipates.

Meanwhile it’s a reminder that fire season is coming. The time to check your readiness is Now before it’s too late to be effective. Check those fire extinguishers to see if they still have a charge. Clean up any dry debris that could become kindling. Give some thought to exactly what you will take if you have to leave in a hurry because you won’t be clear about it in the moment.

Follow the latest wildfire news:
* on Twitter: http://twitter.com/BCGovFireInfo
* on Facebook: http://facebook.com/BCForestFireInfo

Think about using the RDKB’s new Voyent Alert App to get the most up-to-date notifications on your phone or mobile device. We learned more about this during Preparedness Week.

City Council Oct 9, 2018

Oct 9, 2018 was a long day for council.
It began with a Committee Of The Whole meeting starting at 9AM. That meeting didn’t look very involved in the agenda but ended up taking a lot longer when it actually took place, 2 hours and 49 minutes.
They had an in-camera meeting after that.
In the evening they had one of the shortest meetings on record for this council – less than 11 minutes!
And this will be the last meeting of this council before the voting for the next council happens. (not the very last meeting of this council though)

Where was all the discussion in the Committee Of The Whole meeting?

Regional Topics with Area D, the CAO & Recovery Manager report,

 

The Regular Meeting. Less than 11 minutes. ’nuff said. (normally an item has to get at least 90 seconds of discussion to get a slice in the pie. That left only two slices so I shortened it to 30 seconds)


The meetings from beginning to end.

 

REGIONAL TOPICS FOR DISCUSSION - WITH AREA D Monthly Highlight Reports CAO and Recovery Manager Bylaw 2054 ??? Smoke And Vape Free Places Bylaw revitalization_tax_exemption QUESTION PERIOD FROM THE PUBLIC COUNCIL REPORTS RDKB REPORT Capital Project Funding from Reserves Temporary Use Permit Application 7255 Riverside Drive for a Church Bylaw 2051 - 2019 Revenue Anticipation Borrowing QUESTIONS FROM THE PUBLIC AND THE MEDIA

Valley Socked In With Smoke

The other day I had to visit the Museum so I did the ‘short cut’ up Hardy Mtn. Road and past the reservoir. On the way back I took a side trip further up Hardy to get a vantage point of the valley. And took a picture.

The next day it appeared to be much worse and I had to visit the museum once again so I took another pic from the same location. You can see the difference below.

The two fires to the north of us are still going . . . but the crews are holding the line – at least the southern line of the bigger fire.

For the closer fire (Toronto Creek)

Last updated: Saturday, August 18, 2018 at 12:32 PM

Location: Approximately 12 km north of Downtown Grand Forks and about 2 kilometres east of Granby Road.
• See approximate location of this wildfire on an See Map interactive map
• View an interactive map of all active Wildfires of Note.

Discovered: Saturday, August 11, 2018

Size: 12.0 hectares

Status: Active
• 70% contained
This fire is 70% contained. The remainder of this fire is burning in steep and difficult terrain. Crews are putting a line of hose on this section of fire.

This fire is in ‘being held’ status meaning that the fire has received sufficient suppression action that it is not likely to spread beyond existing or predetermined boundaries under the prevailing and forecasted conditions.

InterfaceInterface Interface Fire

Evacuation Alert is in effect.

As a precautionary measure and in the interest of public safety, the Regional District of Kootenay Boundary has issued an evacuation alert for properties along Granby Road and Volcanic Creek Road. For more information on this alert, please contact the RDKB at 250 368-0259 or visit their website at www.rdkb.com

More information
This fire is located in rugged terrain and is displaying active growth.

Crews are working to contain the fire using machine guard and natural features.

Cause: Lightning Lightning Caused

Resources
• 5 firefighters
• 1 helicopters
• 1 heavy equipment
Ground crews continue to action this fire today with the aid of air support and heavy equipment.

 

For the further away fire (Lynch Creek)

Location: Approximately 25 km north of Downtown Grand Forks and about two km northeast of North Fork Road
• See approximate location of this wildfire on an See Map interactive map
• View an interactive map of all active Wildfires of Note.

Discovered: Saturday, August 11, 2018

Size: 150.0 hectares

Status: Active
• 0% contained

InterfaceInterface Interface Fire

Evacuation Alert is in effect.

As a precautionary measure and in the interest of public safety, the Regional District of Kootenay Boundary has issued an evacuation alert for all properties from the junction of Miller Creek Forest Service Road to kilometre 34 on Granby Road. The Granby River is the western boundary. For more information on this alert, please contact the RDKB at 250 368-0259 or visit their website at www.rdkb.com

More information
The Lynch Creek FSR is closed. Click here for a detailed map.

Cause: Under Investigation

Resources
• 50 firefighters
• 2 helicopters
• 8 heavy equipment
Good progress has been made with containment lines on the south flank of this fire. Crews continue to work on containment on the northwest flank of this fire with the support of heavy equipment and bucketing helicopters.

Smoke gets in your eyes, lungs, house, etc . . . what to do about it.

Update at bottom

Back in 2015 the valley filled with wildfire smoke and I began to find myself just on the edge of not being able to catch my breath. Since then I’ve learned that I have asthma and that knowledge has explained a lot. But simply knowing doesn’t give you protection from the smoke.

The best advice for people with compromised breathing when things get this bad is ‘go somewhere else’. Well even if I could afford that (and I cannot) where in BC isn’t experiencing some amount of smoke in the air?

IF you live in a house with forced air heating then you likely have a furnace filter and maybe even an integrated air scrubber. If that is the case I’d advise you to check your filter and replace it if necessary. Or if you have an electrostatic cleaner that requires cleaning – do that now.

But what if you are like me and don’t have forced air heating? Or live in a multi-unit dwelling and have no control over that part of the infrastructure?

Well back in 2015 I did some research and found out how to make my own air cleaner. It’s primitive but it works enough that the night I didn’t use it I woke up with a headache from all the crap I breathed all night.

So here are my videos of my home-built air scrubber – I made another one yesterday Aug 12, 2018. The one below is the first, the one after shows how dirty the filter got in just 4 days . . .

One last note for you If you have a relatively later model car, truck, van or SUV you might find the air in there cleaner than the air in your house. All modern vehicles have cabin air filter systems that try to clean the air feeding into the cabin. So if you’re desperate you might want to get in your vehicle, close all the windows and turn on the air system. Just don’t do that in your garage . . .

 

UPDATE

This is what the filter I built on Sunday looks like Wednesday morning almost 3 days later