Daily Archives: June 27, 2019

Values Now and Then

In the city’s mitigation FAQ page they answer the question of how the valuation of buy-out properties will be done saying that the province and federal governments will only go with post flood value.

” … the best it could get from the provincial and federal funding streams was the post flood value “

under the question: We were told that we would get the pre-flood value for our house, what happened?

When I look at the graph showing the timelines for various projects funded by this announcement I see that property acquisition begins in 2019 and stretches into 2020. I have a question about which valuation will actually be used in determining buyout value when the negotiation with the property owner actually happens.

A lot of those properties in North Ruckle have seen a drop into the four figure category. I mean that some properties that were worth 50 to 150 thousand dollars are now worth less than $10,000. That is pretty sad but not unexpected.

But not all of them have seen that same drop and some are still worth, on paper by BC assessment, over $50,000 or $100,000. Some of these property owners have actually spent money out of their own pocket, or the money that they got from the insurance companies (if they got any help from the insurance companies), to get their properties back in shape. Remember that doing this was one of the things suggested to them by the city and others when it was clear this process would take a couple of years.

My worry is that once this process gets rolling the assessments for those properties will also drop into the basement because all of the properties around them are essentially being devalued to Zero. The valuations that BC Assessments uses are what they calculate the values are as of Oct 31 the year before they issue your new year’s assessed value.

So if your property is still worth $100,000 in the year of 2019 and come 2020 you find that your property value has now plummeted – what is that going to do to your buy-out?

If you have to wait until 2020 before they negotiate a price on your buy-out what will your property value be then?

IF this is the case (and to be clear I am NOT saying this is the way it is – only asking a question) is there any way to either freeze the valuation used in the buyout to the 2019 value OR push the properties which still have a good value to earlier in the list to prevent the property owners from encountering yet more pain and suffering due to purely bureaucratic process?

The city is supposed to try and do the best they can on behalf of their tax paying residents . . . I think some resolution on this question is in order. If only to put the minds of those who have already lost so much and have no clear path into the future at rest.

UPDATED to point out that this is a question about how it works and not a statement about how it works.

Provincial Parks Expanding

The province dispatched the MLA for Nanaimo, Sheila Malcolmson, to deliver some good news to the folks at Christina Lake: The Government of British Columbia is adding land to two provincial parks Gladstone and Garibaldi. Specifically, a 6 hectare addition to Gladstone and 5.6 hectares to Garibaldi.

You can watch the event below and read the press release below that.

For Immediate Release Ministry of Environment and Climate Change Strategy

Protected land added to two provincial parks

VICTORIA -The Government of British Columbia is adding land to two provincial parks Gladstone and Garibaldi -to protect ecologically sensitive areas, promote biodiversity and enhance recreation opportunities.

“Our parks are important for bringing families and communities together. They also protect B.C’s incredible biodiversity with ecosystems found nowhere else in the world,” said George Heyman, Minister of Environment and Climate Change Strategy. “Acquiring these lands ensures the conservation and protection of sensitive habitat so British Columbians can enjoy our spectacular natural spaces for years to come.”

Valued at $1.74 million, the Province purchased two lots from a private vendor at the north end of Christina Lake for a six-hectare addition to Gladstone Provincial Park near Grand Forks.

Featuring a natural beach/lake frontage, open forest and pockets of old growth, the properties were the last remaining private inholdings of the Sandner Creek drainage, which is used by 70% of the stream-spawning kokanee in Christina Lake. Securing the land for park purposes creates a continuous protected area on the north end of the lake.

“The Christina Lake Stewardship Society is extremely delighted to hear about the purchase of land at the north end of Christina Lake,” said Jeff Olsen, president, Christina Lake Stewardship Society. “This sensitive and diverse area hosts a myriad of plant and wildlife, some of which are species at risk like the western painted turtle. As depletion of wetlands continues, this acquisition is not only an engaging action taken by the Province, it is also an immensely important one for Christina Lake.”

The Province also purchased 5.6 hectares that were completely surrounded by Garibaldi Park near Squamish. Valued at $955,000, the property will help provide more opportunities for recreation in the Diamond Head area of the park.

Quick Facts:

One of the largest park systems in the world, British Columbia has 1,033 provincial parks, recreation areas, conservancies, ecological reserves and protected areas. They cover more than 14 million hectares, or approximately 14.4% of the provincial land base.

The Province regularly adds land to the parks and protected areas system through the acquisition of private land, and partnerships with conservation groups and individual donors.

Learn More:

For more information about the BC Parks Land Acquisition Program, visit: http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/bcparks/partnerships/landAcguisition.html

For more information about BC Parks, visit: http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/bcparks/